New Shire boss Ure to concentrate on playing

Derek Ure watches on as Shire fall to a 2-0 defeat at Kelty (Pic: Kevin Marshall)
Derek Ure watches on as Shire fall to a 2-0 defeat at Kelty (Pic: Kevin Marshall)

East Stirlingshire legend Derek Ure has called time on his long playing career with the club after being appointed Shire’s new manager.

The 34 year-old has racked up more than 300 appearances in the black and white hoops since his debut in 2001 but was not in the squad as Shire went down to a disappointing 2-0 Lowland League defeat at Kelty Hearts at the weekend, in his first official game in charge, and he says he is now unlikely to feature regularly in a playing capacity.

Kelty are newly promoted from the juniors, but have hit the ground running in the Lowland League. (Pic: Kevin Marshall)

Kelty are newly promoted from the juniors, but have hit the ground running in the Lowland League. (Pic: Kevin Marshall)

Ure was given the managerial hotseat, with striker Andy Rodgers as his number two, following the recent parting of the ways with former boss John Sludden and he now wants to concentrate on pulling the club out of a tailspin after six matches without a victory.

“Currently I think the aim is to step back from playing,” said Ure.

“The priority right now is for me to focus more on preparation and I can do that better from the sidelines.

“So, apart from an injury crisis or in certain games where we need someone with experience to do a job, I won’t be in the squad.

“In any case, I have had a few injury problems recently and was advised in the summer that maybe I should consider retiring from playing.

“I spent last season unable to train twice a week because of those problems so perhaps now is the right time to stop playing.”

Taking on the Shire manager’s job may have seemed a natural progression for a player who is synonymous with the club in the eyes of many, but Ure said he had never actively considered taking on the role until it was offered to him.

“I didn’t envisage getting the job as this stage but when we were given the opportunity it was something we had to consider,” he said.

“When John Sludden brought me back to the club and made me captain I was really proud.

“And John and I had conversations where he said he thought one day I might succeed him but obviously neither of us had in mind the circumstances that led to it happening.”

Ure is honest enough to admit that he remains a rookie boss, whose only previous managerial experience is at boys club level, but believes he can turn results around with help from his players.

“We must do better as a team and we must work hard and, if we do that, then the results will come,” he added.