Tributes paid to Falkirk journalist Anne Caine

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Tributes have been paid to a Falkirk-born journalist who died suddenly at the end of September.

Anne Caine was only 47 when she lost her battle with ill health on September 22.

She leaves husband Iain, a former postman, and ten-year-old son Joe.

Brought up with her two younger sisters in Limerigg, Anne moved to Grangemouth when she met Iain.

She studied journalism at the then Napier College in Edinburgh and worked at the Falkirk & Grangemouth Advertiser before moving to the Lothian Courier.

Anne then worked with the Scotland on Sunday before taking up a post as chief sub-editor at the Greenock Telegraph where she later became editor.

After leaving the Telegraph in 2013 Anne worked at East Renfrewshire Council in their communications department and then at Argyll and Bute Council.

Anne’s mother Kathleen Gray died in 2005 and her dad James Gray is being cared for in a nursing home.

Sister Jennifer (42) is a college tutor and artist who lives in Bo’ness with partner Scott and their son Harvey (6).

Anne’s youngest sister, Louise Campbell (37) lives in Grangemouth and is married to Andrew and has two daughters, Amy (22) and Mollie (6).

Louise said the family is devastated at their unexpected loss.

Although Anne had first become ill 18 months ago and bravely battled a string of serious health issues, everyone was surprised when she took a turn for the worse.

Louise said: ”It has hit the family really hard. We were completely in shock.

“We knew she wasn’t in the best of health but she seemed to be adapting. I spoke to her the day before and she seemed fine.”

She added her sister had been getting ready to go into the office when her husband had called an ambulance to take her to hospital.

“She kept saying ‘I’ll be fine’ – she didn’t want to give in to it. But she knew then she wouldn’t be able to work again and that was the worst thing for her.”

In a tribute, Inverclyde Council leader Stephen McCabe said: “The relationship between council and local newspaper can be close, tense, argumentative and friendly.

“Sometimes that happens all in the same day. What never changes is that the personal qualities of good people always shine through. “In any dealings with Anne, she was clearly a thoroughly decent person and was always cheery and positive in her manner.”

Anne’s funeral took place at Falkirk Crematorium on October 8.