School closed in Standburn as weather bomb hits Falkirk

Wednesday's storms affected power lines, leading to the closure of Drumbowie Primary and loss of power to homes in Standburn. Picture: Michael Gillen
Wednesday's storms affected power lines, leading to the closure of Drumbowie Primary and loss of power to homes in Standburn. Picture: Michael Gillen

A school was closed yesterday as the effects of the ‘weather bomb’ hit the Falkirk district - with more rain, sleet and high winds expected today.

Drumbowie Primary School in Standburn did not open yesterday due to a problem with power from an overhead electricity cable.

Parents were informed as they dropped their children off at the school in the morning.

A Falkirk Council spokeswoman said: “Drumbowie Primary School could not open as there was a lack of power from an overhead electricity cable which meant there was no heating or sufficient lighting. This was the only school in the district affected.”

A Scottish Power spokesman said: “This was a localised fault which affected around 50 properties. Our engineers attended to the problem immediately and power was reconnected at around 11 a.m. We apologise for the inconvenience this caused.”

The council is asking residents to take extra precautions as more gale force winds and rain are expected to cause further disruptions throughout the day.

Councillor Dr Craig Martin said: “Our winter response plans are in place and preparations are well underway to reduce the impact extreme weather can have on our communities.

“We must all be better prepared and I would ask local residents to think about what actions they can take as individuals to help themselves and others.”

A Met Office yellow alert remains in place for central Scotland and people are being urged to check travel plans before setting off on journeys, as well as taking care on roads as stopping distances in vehicles can be affected by the bad weather.

Chief Superintendent Iain Murray, Police Scotland Head of Roads Policing, said: “We would urge the public to please follow our advice to travel with extra caution.”

WHAT IS A WEATHER BOMB?

A weather bomb, or explosive cyclogenesis as it is known, is a storm that intensifies when pressure at its centre rapidly drops by more than 24 millibars in 24 hours

Although a relatively new term, weather bombs were defined in 1980 and take place several times a year, more commonly in winter and are more likely to occur when the jet stream is strong

Gusts of up to 80mph have been recorded during the current weather bomb in the UK, while waves in the Outer Hebrides have reached a height of 45ft

The north of Scotland has been the worst affected with travel and power disruptions