Letter from the Editor: A refreshing look at the positives

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As someone who has to do a fair bit of driving in the course of their work, it won’t come as much of a revelation when I tell you that roadworks are the bain of my life.

I always try to leave in plenty of time for meetings, esepcially when they are a fair distance away, but inevitably one of two things happen.

You sit in traffic watching the estimated time of arrival creep up and up along with your blood pressure

Either it’s a trouble-free journey and I arrive so far ahead of schedule that I have to cool my heels for an a hour or so, or I get snarled up in roadworks and end up having to call ahead to explain that I’m running late.

And, while sat navs may be a great invention, in this situation they are no help at all as you sit in traffic watching the estimated time of arrival creep up and up along with your blood pressure.

Then, of course, there’s the lack of co-ordination when it comes to roadworks.

I was in Kincardine earlier this week and had to sit for five minutes at a four-way set of temporary lights which have suddenly reappeared in the village. These negotiated I made my way towards the bridge only to find it was closed and a diverision put in place, taking me - you’ve guessed it - past the original set of lights again.

In such circumstances, it’s easy forget that there’s a reason these works take place.

Which is why, while judging the Falkirk Herald Business Awards last week, it was refrreshing to hear a finalist glossing over concerns that the ongoing work in Falkirk tonw centre could affect her business and instead focusing on the benefits the revamp would ultimately bring.