Offender smashes partner’s mobile phone and shatters her car windows

Baxter was angry his partner chose to sleep on the sofa on their first anniversary
Baxter was angry his partner chose to sleep on the sofa on their first anniversary

A couple’s first anniversary celebrations ended in violent vandalism as an angry boyfriend smashed his partner’s car windows.

James Baxter (26) marked his first 12 months with his partner by throwing her mobile phone at her and damaging it and then shattering two driver’s side windows on her car.

Appearing at Falkirk Sheriff Court last Thursday, Baxter had admitted damaging his girlfriend’s property at his 39 Brooke Street, Grangemouth home on November 21 last year.

Procurator fiscal depute Ruaridh Ferguson said: “The argument started because the complainer fell asleep on the sofa. There was a struggle between the two and the complainer ran out into the garden.

“A neighbour saw the accused follow her with a mobile phone in his hand, which he threw at the complainer, narrowly missing her. The phone, which belonged to the complainer, was damaged as a result.”

The encounter did not end when Baxter’s partner got to her car.

Mr Ferguson said: “He smashed two windows on the drivers side. Police were contacted and the accused was detained later that day. He told officers he threw the phone and he shouldn’t have done that – he said he would replace it.”

The court heard the complainer is carrying Baxter’s child and the couple want to get back together following this incident, which kicked off because Baxter was angry she did not come to bed on their first anniversary and instead slept on the couch.

It was stated Baxter’s response to this was an “overreaction” and he had replaced the damaged car windows and broken phone.

Baxter, who was said to have a history of vandalism, was last convicted of a crime back in 2012.

Sheriff Derek Livingston placed Baxter on a supervised community payback order for two years with the condition he complete 135 hours of unpaid work within six months. A review of the order was called for in eight week’s time.