Falkirk jailbird son bludgeoned mum with rolling pin

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A brutal thug is facing a life behind bars after he tried to kill his mother with a rolling pin.

James Martin (41) left the 64-year-old for dead after the frenzied attack – which saw him strike her multiple times on the head with the weapon – at her flat in Falkirk. She lay injured on the floor for more than three hours until her sister found her.

Martin appeared at the High Court in Glasgow today having earlier admitted the attempted murder he committed on January 28.

Judge Lord Boyd heard how the life of the keen choir singer had been wrecked – she is no longer able to live on her own and has mobility issues months after the assault.

Martin had only been freed from jail three months before the attack.

Lord Boyd adjourned again after Lord Boyd instructed a full risk assessment to be carried out Martin.

He added: “If the risk criteria are met, I am bound to impose an Order for Lifelong Restriction.”

Martin’s mother allowed him to move in with her in late 2018.

However, she kicked him out – just days before the attempted murder – following a row and this was said to have made Martin “unhappy”.

He later turned up at the premises again and another disagreement broke out.

The court heard the prosecution state: “Martin walked into the kitchen area and took hold of a rolling pin lying on the table. He struck his mother several times on the head and body with it.

“This caused her to fall to the floor where Martin then repeatedly punched and kicked her.”

Martin used so much force his mum’s dentures fell out with her glasses and ear-rings also coming off.

He left her on the floor severely injured when it would have been clear to him she required medical care.

It was three-and-a-half hours later when her sister a visited, coming round to collect home baking, but finding her sibling lying in the blood-splattered flat.

She told her sister it was Martin who attacked her with the rolling pin and was rushed to hospital,

She had bleeding on the brain as well as jaw, cheek, rib and collarbone fractures. There were also wounds so deep her skull could be seen.

Medics believed Helen had suffered a “traumatic” brain injury.

She was finally able to leave rehabilitation earlier in May, but now has to live in supported accommodation and needs someone with her at all times.

The court heard she now struggles with even simple tasks and unable to enjoy her singing hobby with the choir because she cannot follow words to the songs anymore.

Her son was held by police for the attack and stated: “I am sorry for what happened, but I cannot remember.”

This was Martin’s fourth High Court conviction – he had been locked up for 12 years in 2005 for assault and robbery.

Martin, who was remanded in custody, will next appear at a hearing in Edinburgh on October 25.