Cask ale buffs serve up a ‘Your Beer is Good’ rating for two Falkirk pubs

The Wheatsheaf Inn, Falkirk's oldest pub.
The Wheatsheaf Inn, Falkirk's oldest pub.

Two very different Falkirk bars have rated a listing in the newly-published 2020 edition of the Campaign for Real Ale (CAMRA) Good Beer Guide.

They are the historic Wheatsheaf Inn, Falkirk’s oldest pub, and J D Wetherspoon bar The Carron Works, both of which were selected by local members of the cask ale pressure group.

J D Wetherspoon's Falkirk pub, The Carron Works.

J D Wetherspoon's Falkirk pub, The Carron Works.

The rating is assessed over several visits and aims to reflect both the quality and range of cask ales on offer as well as customer service, décor and overall atmosphere.

The Carron Works’ manager, David McAuley, said: “I am delighted that The Carron Works has been recognised for the quality of its real ales by CAMRA members.

“We offer our customers an excellent range of real ales at all times, including those from regional brewers and microbrewers, as well as hosting our own beer festivals.

“Staff at the pub work hard to ensure that the real ales on offer are kept in first-class condition at all times and the pub’s inclusion in the guide highlights this.”

Meanwhile the owners of the Wheatsheaf, which dates from the late 18th century, pride themselves on hosting locally-produced ales - sometimes staging special “takeover” days where all the cask beers on offer are from a single brewery - as well as a wide choice of Scottish and English ales.

The bar is owned by husband and wife team Alison and Ged Hainey, along with Ged’s brother Paul.

Its guide entry describes it as a “must visit venue”, and outlines the high quality of the traditional-style decor and the variety of guest beers on offer.

Alison Hainey said: “The great thing about real ale is the variety - there’s the opportunity to bring exciting ‘new’ beers to customers on a regular basis, and ours sell very well.

“We’re delighted to be able to host beers from Larbert’s Tryst Brewery and the (Grangemouth) Hybrid brewery, besides excellent ales from elsewhere in Scotland, and England.”