VW, Audi and Skoda recall: car models affected by the power error – and if UK vehicles are affected

VW, Audi and Skoda recall: car models affected by the power error – and if UK vehicles are affected
VW, Audi and Skoda recall: car models affected by the power error – and if UK vehicles are affected

Volkswagen have announced that they are recalling 80,000 cars in Australia over a fault that could see affected vehicles suddenly lose power.

A press release from VW Austrlia revealed that cars carrying dual clutch transmissions known as DSG could be susceptible to the issue.

A number of models by Skoda and Audi, both owned by Volkswagen Group,  are also being recalled over the potentially dangerous fault.

But a statement from the Wolfsburg-based car manufacturer has sought to quell fears that UK cars have also been affected by the recall.

Which models have been affected?

As many as 62,000 Volkswagen cars have been affected.

The models recalled were manufactured between 2008 and 2015 and include: Golf, Beetle, Polo, Jetta, Passat and Caddy models.

And 4,500 Skodas have also been impacted, with Fabia, Rapid, Octavia, Yeti and Superb models affected by the recall, as well as 14,000 Audi’s including the A1, A3 and TT models.

Are UK cars part of the recall?

No. A spokesperson for Volkswagen UK revealed to i that UK-based cars weren’t affected by the fault.

“This recall does not affect customers in the United Kingdom,” they said. “It applies only to the South-East Asia region which includes Australia.”

 

 

 

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