Police Scotland’s new chief constable sworn in

Police Scotland's new Chief Constable Phil Gormley, right, with Chief Inspector Chris Stones, after ceremony at Tulliallan Castle. (Picture by Michael Gillen.)
Police Scotland's new Chief Constable Phil Gormley, right, with Chief Inspector Chris Stones, after ceremony at Tulliallan Castle. (Picture by Michael Gillen.)
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Scotland’s new Chief Constable Phil Gormley has been formally sworn in to his role as the head of the country’s police force.

Following the ceremony at the Police Scotland College at Tulliallan this morning, he acknowledged he had one of the most demanding jobs in British policing.

He vowed that in his first 100 days he would get out and listen to officers and staff from across Police Scotland, as well as engaging with local government leaders and key partners to hear their views first hand.

Following the brief ceremony when he was sworn in by Sheriff Principal Marysia Lewis, his first task was to talk to probationers undertaking training at Tulliallan.

Mr Gormley said: “It is an honour to have been selected to lead Police Scotland and I am acutely aware of the significant responsibility and expectation that comes with the role of Chief Constable, Police Scotland.

“This is one of the most demanding jobs in British policing and I feel immensely proud to have been chosen to lead the men and women of Police Scotland through the next stage of its journey.

“Today I met officers who, like me, are starting their careers with Police Scotland. Over the next weeks and months, I will be talking and listening to, not only Police Scotland officers and staff but also our partners, to help inform how we respond to the challenges the service faces. The professional judgement and discretion of these officers and their colleagues across the country will be critical in meeting these challenges.”

His police career began in Thames Valley Police in 1985 and he progressed to be a commander with the Metropolitan Police, responsible for special branch and counter terrorism.

Mr Gormley spent three years at the chief constable of Norfolk Constabulary and latterly was the deputy director general of the National Crime Agency.

His role with Police Scotland, which comes with a reported £212,000 annual salary, comes at a time when the force is under fire for its handling of the M9 crash near Stirling last July which left a Falkirk couple dead after officers took three days to respond.