Know your limits and keep in touch

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In the Surgery with Professor George Crooks

It takes about one hour for your body to break down one unit of alcohol, however be aware that this can vary, depending on whether you are male or female, how much you weigh, your age, and how much food you have eaten.

One unit is equivalent to 10ml or 8g of pure alcohol.

There are roughly 
2.1 units in a standard glass (175ml) of average-strength wine (12%) and 3 units in a pint of higher-strength lager, beer or cider (5.2%)

If you drink a large (250ml) glass of wine or one pint of strong lager your body takes about three hours to break down the alcohol.

However, if you have a 
few drinks during a night out, it can take many hours for the alcohol to leave your body.

The alcohol could still be in your blood the next day. This means that if you drive you could still be over the legal alcohol limit.

I’m going into hospital for an operation and have to stay for about three days. Will I still be allowed to use my mobile phone there?

It depends on the hospital’s policy on use of mobile phones.

You can probably use your mobile phone in some areas of the hospital to make calls or send text messages. Communication with family and friends is important when someone is in hospital and the guidance will be there to safeguard patients’ privacy and dignity and ensure that interference from mobile phones does not stop medical equipment from working properly.

Depending on your hospital’s policy, areas where mobile phone use is allowed could include: the hospital entrance or reception communal areas such as cafés and lift lobbies and non-clinical areas on wards where direct medical care is not given.

Do keep in mind, however, that it’s unlikely that you will be allowed to charge your mobile phone while in hospital.

If your phone has a camera, it’s unlikely that you’ll be allowed to take photographs in hospitals except under very specific circumstances, for example, they may make an exception for parents with a newborn baby.​