Keeping your distance pays

Sophie Wallace
Sophie Wallace

Loyal readers will probably have picked up on the fact I spend quite a fair bit of my time in Newcastle. And those clever enough to put two and two together, will realise this is where boyfriend is from. Yes, you guessed it – I’m in a long-distance relationship, and, in my opinion, it’s the best thing that’s ever happened to me.

Those who know me well know how easily I get distracted. I’ll be in the middle of a sentence, see something on TV and get completely sidetracked. And at important times like these, when I have Highers and such to prepare for, it’s up to me to make sure I have absolutely nothing distracting me. It’s great knowing I don’t have to see my boyfriend every other day. I don’t have to worry about losing half a week of study because we only see each other, mostly, every other weekend. A few friends think the fact I only get to see him for a weekend maybe two or three times a month is absolutely nuts, but, personally, I think it’s fantastic.

It means we’re not living in each others pockets and have time to study, work, go training and everything else.

The distance thing also means I’m not bored of him yet. Not seeing each other as much as some other couples means we get to miss one another quite a lot.

This can be a big negative sometimes – there are always days where I really do get myself upset because I miss him so much.

All that sadness just gets converted into anticipation, though, because I realise I’ve only got a week or so to wait until I get to see him again. It means the time we do get to spend together is great, and we’re not taking that for granted.

It’s not like I go ages without actually seeing him. Skype is a godsend. We dedicate an hour a night to talking face-to-face and, even then, I get all happy speaking to him.

Six months we’ve been together now and he’s still not annoyed me properly, which is an achievement in itself for any boy, especially one with a funny accent and the mentality of a five-year-old.