Backing for Grangemouth railway station

The former railway station building in Grangemouth, virtually derelict in July 1975.
The former railway station building in Grangemouth, virtually derelict in July 1975.

When I last wrote this column in June, I spoke of my amazement that a town as big and commercially important as Grangemouth was not served by a railway station – despite a working line running directly through the settlement.

I concluded by asking readers who agreed that a new station should be opened to write in. Judging by the number of e-mails, letters and tweets I received, it’s clear many folk feel strongly about the issue.

Portonians live in one of the few places in Scotland that is still home to some heavy industry, and new commercial ventures – some welcome, some not so welcome – still regularly open in the town, attracted by its excellent sea, road and rail links.

Now, most people can take advantage of its easy access to nearby motorways, but it’s unlikely they will ever have a reason to use the port. But, if they did, that option would be open to them – in theory.

But the railway is a different matter. If residents want to use the railway that passes through their town, they must travel to Falkirk Grahamston. Why? Because Grangemouth station – hence why there’s still a Station Road – closed in 1968.

Thousands of people are forced to drive on the town’s congested roads to work at the oil refinery, port or one of the dozens of other businesses in the area. Re-open a station and they could take the train instead.

It’s time Portonians were given something back. Perhaps one of the many companies based in the town – or one of the firms hoping to move there – could lend their support.

My e-mail address is printed above.