Mary tells the world ... as nation decides

The official announcement that Scotland had said No to indepence came around 8.35 a.m.

Chief Counting Officer Mary Pitcaithly, who is also Falkirk Council’s chief executive, revealed the final figures at the Royal Highland Centre at Ingliston, near Edinburgh.

Chief Counting Officer Mary Pitcaithly announces result of the Scottish Independence Referendum''Picture: Michael Gillen

Chief Counting Officer Mary Pitcaithly announces result of the Scottish Independence Referendum''Picture: Michael Gillen

However, it was almost an anti-climax as shortly after 7 a.m. she had already confirmed that the majority of the country’s electorate had voted to stay in the United Kingdom.

The result became a certainty around an hour earlier when the Fife counting officer had revealed a comfortable victory for the No campaign.

Across Scotland 2,001,926 (55.3 per cent) people said No to independence with 1,617,989 (44.7 per cent) voting Yes.

The national turnout was 84.5 per cent of the electorate – the largest in the UK for 63 years.

In the Falkirk Council area 108,626 ballot papers were counted, 88.7 per cent of those eligible to vote.

The number voting No was 58,030 (53.4 per cent) with 50,489 (46.4 per cent) saying Yes.

There were 107 rejected papers, including 14 people who voted in favour of both answers to the independence question.