Disabled woman sent home from Forth Valley Royal despite suffering life-threatening infection

Marie Lochrie with mum Michelle
Marie Lochrie with mum Michelle
  • Marie Lochrie had serious infection in her brain that eventually required emergency surgery
  • Marie has Moyamoya, a condition so rare it affects just one in two million people

The family of a brave woman battling a rare brain disease has hit out at the treatment she received from an out-of-hours-GP service.

Marie Lochrie was sent home from Forth Valley Royal Hospital despite having a serious infection in her brain that eventually required emergency surgery and could have cost her life.

You don’t need to be a doctor to know Marie needed urgent medical attention

Michelle Mochrie

Marie has Moyamoya, a condition blocking the flow of blood and oxygen to the brain, causing mini-strokes and haemorrhaging.

The disease is so rare it affects just one in two million people and as a result the 24-year-old has had several surgeries on her brain, the last in April.

On Saturday, June 27 her family became concerned about her condition.

Mum Michelle (45) said: “Marie’s head was very swollen and the skin was coming apart at her head. We had concerns over the way the wound was healing and had been to the GP four times. The swelling got a lot worse and as it was the weekend we took her to the out of hours GP at Larbert.”

After Marie, who also has Downs Syndrome, is registered blind and has left side paralysis, was seen by a doctor but discharged after being told there was nothing they could do.

Michelle continued: “I couldn’t believe they weren’t even going to scan her, but I was told the hospital works on a limited service at the weekend. You don’t need to be a doctor to know Marie needed urgent medical attention,”

The following day, Marie attended her GP who sent her by ambulance straight to Edinburgh Royal Infirmary where she had emergency surgery on her brain.

She had developed an infection and had to have part of her skull removed, fluid drained from her brain and a blood transfusion.

She is still in intensive care on intravenous antibiotics and doctors have warned it could be up to six months before she is discharged.

Michelle said: “The doctors at Edinburgh said they couldn’t believe she was sent home in that state and it’s lucky we looked for another opinion. I’m just so angry at the treatment we received and now I’d think twice about going to that hospital for anything.”

A spokesperson for NHS Forth Valley said: “We are very sorry to hear about the concerns raised by this family. We have been in contact with them and a full investigation is under way to establish the circumstances.”