Festival is a new chapter for Falkirk

Casi Dylan, projects manager, Edinburgh International Book Festival launches Landwords at Callendar House
Casi Dylan, projects manager, Edinburgh International Book Festival launches Landwords at Callendar House
0
Have your say

Book your place at a new 
festival which will be another chapter in the story of Callendar House.

LandWords will take place over two weekends in April and May. It will allow all ages to explore the landmark building, the surrounding landscape and the local community, as well as the stories surrounding it with some of today’s best writers and illustrators.

Produced by Edinburgh International Book Festival in collaboration with Falkirk Community Trust, it is supported by the People’s Postcode Lottery.

The first events will be on the weekend of April 16 and 17 when there will be a series of indoor and outdoor events inspired by the anniversary of the birth of John Muir.

These include Geoff Bailey, the trust’s keeper of archaeology, exploring the story of Falkirk’s country estates and Jan Patience hosting a discussion with Louise Wylie, daughter of the late George Wylie, which coincides with an exhibition of his work at the Park Gallery.

Author Alan Bissett will also read from Alight Here, an anthology of Falkirk writing which he edited, as well as giving a performance of his light-hearted play about life in the town, What the F**kirk.

On May 14 and 15 there will be renowned artists and writers, including Kelpies sculptor Andy Scott, New York novelist Reif Larsen and Scottish writer Sara Sheridan.

Pupils from Graeme High School and members of Step Forth walking group have been producing creative work about Callendar House and the surrounding communities.

Janet Smyth from the Edinburgh International Book Festival said: “Both our LandWords weekends bring together authors, artists and storytellers to explore our sense of identity and how it relates to history and place.

“It is all inspired and hosted by Callendar House and its grounds. We want to know how we tell our own stories of the places that shape us and how those stories fit with recorded history.”