‘Fracking’ meetings to be held in Denny and Grangemouth

An anti-fracking protestor outside Ineos headquarters in Grangemouth last month. Picture: Michael Gillen
An anti-fracking protestor outside Ineos headquarters in Grangemouth last month. Picture: Michael Gillen
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Local campaigners and Green party members have organised two public meetings to discuss the potential impact of the unconventional gas drilling industry in central Scotland.

The issue has been the subject of much debate since Dart Energy, as it was then known, applied in 2013 for a licence to extract coalbed methane gas from a site near Airth. A public inquiry was held on the matter last year and a decision has yet to be made.

Global energy giant Ineos announced last year that it had begun buying up rights to allow it to explore hundreds of square miles around its Grangemouth site for shale gas.

The company is so confident this new investment will pay off it’s guaranteeing to give local communities six per cent of any revenues generated - a move which could equate to £375 million.

But there remains considerable opposition locally to both schemes, with environmental concerns topping a list of objections.

A meeting will take place on Wednesday in Denny High School at 7 p.m. to offer more information on what so-called fracking could mean for the Falkirk district.

Oragnised by Denny & Dunipace Against Unconventional Gas, the event will be an “unbiased” look whether the industry should be welcomed by the local community. Among the speakers will be Green MSP Patrick Harvie and a representative from Ineos. Questions will also be invited from the foor.

Meanwhile, the Falkirk branch of the Green party has organised a similar meeting at Grangemouth Town Hall on Wednesday, January 28, at 7 p.m.

Speakers at the event will include Green MSP Alison Johnstone MSP, Andrew Kinnell of the Scottish Socialist Party, and Professor Andrew Watterson, drector of the Centre for Public Health at Stirling University.