Maddiston pupils get big results in the garden

Maddiston primary pupils Daniel Risk (10), Anya Phillips (10), Josh Cantell (9), Holly Allan (8), Morgan Pitcaithly (11), Elliot Wortley (11) and Ailish Ogilvie (9) in the school garden. Picture: Michael Gillen (141900B)

Maddiston primary pupils Daniel Risk (10), Anya Phillips (10), Josh Cantell (9), Holly Allan (8), Morgan Pitcaithly (11), Elliot Wortley (11) and Ailish Ogilvie (9) in the school garden. Picture: Michael Gillen (141900B)

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Happy pupils have reaped a monster harvest from their grow-your-own school garden plot.

The project started last year when the children planted the ingredients for a wholesome salad, from lettuce to cucumber ... and it grew from there.

The Maddiston Primary School pupils have grown vegetables, including giant courgettes, which have being blossoming in the garden they created. They also planted potatoes which the primary seven pupils dug up for a ‘Dig for Victory’ project which was part of World War One and Two topics.

They are now learning about the origins and nutritious values of the food we eat and how to prepare and cook them. And according to teacher Richard Whitall, they are really digging it.

He said: “Last year we grew a whole school salad and we’ve never seen children more excited than when they ate their own homegrown lettuce.

“This year we can hardly believe the results of our harvest. We have been very successful with our potatoes, carrots, chard, beetroot, courgettes – they are now the size of huge marrows – and all of our fruit trees and bushes are full. The kids have loved preparing healthy snacks.”

Parents and secondary school volunteers have also been digging in, helping the pupils build a raised bed, weed the plot and sow seeds.

Mr Whitall said the children were very proud of their achievements.

He added: “By growing food locally we can reduce the amount of finite resources consumed in transporting them and can help reduce carbon emissions, cut back on packaging, understand seasonal food, reduce the need for genetically modified and imported foods and educate the children about how vital nutrition is.”