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Criminals’ cash could help save Falkirk’s gravestones

Councillor Dennis Goldie wants work to be carried out to restore headstones in cemeteries
Picture: Michael Gillen

Councillor Dennis Goldie wants work to be carried out to restore headstones in cemeteries Picture: Michael Gillen

 

Cash from criminals should be used to help Falkirk Council improve its cemeteries, 
according to a councillor.

Dennis Goldie is writing to the Scottish Government urging Ministers to consider using the Proceeds of Crime Act to help fund work to restore fallen and broken headstones.

He wants the money to be used to train young people as stonemasons, who could then carry out the restoration work in the council’s cemeteries.

Walking through Camelon cemetery, he said: “These gravestones are part of our community’s history and a similar picture is repeated across the district.

“It is dreadful to see so many of them either fallen or knocked over. Some have been broken, others only need their foundations repaired. We need to do something to ensure that they are not lost forever.”

The terms of the 2002 Proceeds of Crime Act, allows the enforcement authorities to track down and recover the profits of crime from individuals “deemed to have benefitted from a criminal lifestyle”.

Since 2003, over £80 million has been recovered from criminals and, since the inception of the Cashback for Communities programme in 2007, over £74 million recovered has been put into projects which benefit mainly young people through free sporting, cultural, youth-work, employability and education throughout Scotland.

Mr Goldie has also called on Falkirk residents to engage with the current consultation on the council’s bereavement services which is looking at issues such as size and type of headstones, and memorials. E-mail bereavement@falkirk.gov.uk with your views.

 

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